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Truth


Forums Forums Philosophy Truth

This topic contains 15 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Lausten 1 month ago.

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    Lausten
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    ‘Science’ can also mean anything ‘science’ has ever thought. And as you gave this thread the title ‘Truth’: grosso modo, one can say that established science presents truths. But everything a scientist says certainly doesn’t.

    Responding to this and generally some of the other statements. When I say “science” or “scientific method”, I’m not trying to bring in some specific claim or historical definition, rather just a few principles that can help everyday conversation. We all expect some level of evidence from others. If someone says it’s raining, we don’t run out and fact check them, but we know we could, so we don’t have to. In the same sense, someone argued the other day that my graph of GDP over the last couple decades was manipulated by mainstream media. I pointed out how easy it would be for anyone to find a graph from 10 years ago and compare the numbers, so that just didn’t make sense. They challenged me to go find the old graph.

    That’s an extreme example, but less extremes happen all the time. People use the term “common sense”. I usually say that “sense” is not that common. Sometimes it is, but often it is used to mean a sense that something needs to fit their preconceived and flawed worldview or it’s false/fake/a lie. As in Trump must be the victim of a deep state conspiracy because all these indictments just don’t fit with their view of him as a good and loyal man. Or, one more straw won’t hurt anything because I’ve been using straws all my life and there are still sea turtles. It’s a failure to apply the principle of allowing your assumptions to be questioned if new data is presented.

     

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