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Medical Marijuana?


Forums Forums Alternative Medicine Medical Marijuana?

This topic contains 55 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  TimB 2 weeks, 4 days ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 46 through 56 (of 56 total)
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  • #299786

    TimB
    Participant

    I did some reading on the aborigines.  Seems they were among the 1st wave of humans to leave Africa, as long as 70K years ago.  Maybe before that they got a bit of Neanderthal nookie. They came thru Asia and maybe got a bit of Denisovian funtime along the way.  And around 50K years ago, reached the land of Aus, divided into groups about the land mass, and all stayed put for those 50K years in Aus, and within their individual groups, such that different cultural groups evolved on the continent.

    #299791

    TimB
    Participant

    It seems strange that after reaching Australia, and splitting into different geographical locales, the groups so steadfastly stayed away from each other.  Weird even.

    #299800

    TimB
    Participant

    Oh, I see.  Wikipedia comes to the rescue. The aborigines have an astoundingly remarkable oral history spanning thousands or 10’s of thousands of yrs.  It also serves as their law and religion.  One aspect of their beliefs has to do with the intricate connection of the land to the individuals who occupy it.  Thus their law/beliefs probably made a solid bond between the land where any particular group was and that group.  Thus each geographic locale of each aborigine group would be virtually tied to that area, by belief and law, and not to any other aborigine group’s land area.

    #299801

    Patrick D
    Participant

    Australian Aboriginal culture has always been  nomadic hunter gatherer.

    That way of life does not support large groups. Instead, Aboriginal society  was made up of  extended family groups  of around 20 people. They had very strict kinship relations which determined with whom an individual could mate; no one from his/her own group.

    North American indigenous  people were split into hundreds of small tribes, with an average size of 300 or less, with some exceptions.  Same goes for many African tribes, as well as nomadic semitic tribes. Look at the Nilotic people, from first settlement for thousands of years.

    It is our urbanised, post industrial  way of life which is relatively unusual. Up until the industrial revolution and well after,  civilisation was essentially agrarian.  The vast majority of people lived in/near small settlements, such as hamlets and small villages. A  person living away from the city would usually never travel more than 20 miles from his place of birth.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Patrick D.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Patrick D.
    #299811

    TimB
    Participant

    That all makes sense, except that we are talking about a ppl who had come all the way from Africa, across a large part of Asia and even intermingled a bit with Neanderthals and Denisovians along the way.  Then when they got to their spots in Australia, they stayed put for 50K yrs.  I suppose that the 20K yrs that may have passed from leaving Africa and getting to Australia were times of tremendous pressures to migrate.

    #299830

    Patrick D
    Participant

    ” Then when they got to their spots in Australia, they stayed put for 50K yrs. ”

    Australia has approx. the same area as the continental United States

    These were nomadic peoples. At the time of white settlement, aborigines lived in every  part of Australia, from the coast, to the desserts to the Island of  Tasmania. They had  trade routes which stretched from Cape York (Queensland) to Cape Leeuwin (most southerly point on the continent, now in Western Australia.

    #299837

    TimB
    Participant

    Oh, check this.  Seems the leading suspect for introducing the dingo is someone other than the aborigines. The dingo was only introduced 4 or 5K yrs ago. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/04/how-did-dingo-get-australia

     

    #299859

    Patrick D
    Participant

    Gee, thanks Tim, that’s terrific!

    I  guess Australian scholars have been guilty of intellectual laziness. A long the lines of “Ah dingo, not indigenous. Of COURSE! He came with aborigines!”

    I think it’s great that academia is  looking beyond the bleedin’ obvious with studies of  our extinct mega fauna. Many are  thought to have become extinct by being hunted by the aborigines. However, that’s a working hypothesis , not a consensus.  We also had a marsupial lion, and others.

    The wiki article linked below is worth a glance.

    “Australian megafauna comprises a number of large animal species in Australia, often defined as species with body mass estimates of greater than 45 kg (100 lb)[1] or equal to or greater than 130% of the body mass of their closest living relatives. Many of these species became extinct during the Pleistocene (16,100±100 – 50,000 years BC).[2]”

    “The cause of the extinction is an active, contentious and factionalised field of research where politics and ideology often takes precedence over scientific evidence, especially when it comes to the possible implications regarding Aboriginal people (who appear to be responsible for the extinctions).[4] It is hypothesised that with the arrival of early Australian Aboriginals (around 70,000~65,000 years ago), hunting and the use of fire to manage their environment may have contributed to the extinction of the megafauna.[5] Increased aridity during peak glaciation (about 18,000 years ago) may have also contributed, but most of the megafauna were already extinct by this time.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_megafauna

    (((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((((0)))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))))

     

    The video below is a full documentary, called “Death Of The Megabeasts”.  I’ve only watched at bit. Seems quite good.

     

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Patrick D.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Patrick D.
    #301307

    TimB
    Participant

    Research by surveys and data review are something, but we really need a LOT more hard science, rigorous methodological research on marijuana.  Reclassification of marijuana from being a federally restricted Class 1 narcotic MUST BE done ASAP.  This part of federal law should have been changed years ago, if not decades ago.  It continues to interfere with hard scientific research being conducted.

     

    #301322

    3point14rat
    Participant

    I have no problem believing these kind of miracle cures if the mechanism by which they work their wonders is given. Just saying something cures cancer, lowers cholesterol, fights obesity (and apparently a thousand other things, according to social media), is a waste of time and makes me even more skeptical that it’s true.

    Nothing would make me happier than having something to cure the most common diseases and disabling conditions our society suffers from. But I’ll wait until there’s a reason to believe it’s true before believing it.

    #301323

    TimB
    Participant

    Check the topic in this Alt Med section, titled “A double blind Study…”

    It links to what seems to be a methodologically sound experiment on Cannabidiol (CBD) decreasing cravings and lowered physical indicators of stress in heroin users exposed to videos designed to elicit cravings.

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