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A behavioral analysis of Bacteria “screaming” when killed


Forums Forums Science and Technology A behavioral analysis of Bacteria “screaming” when killed

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 36 total)
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  • #334012
    @timb
    Participant

    Hopefully you can keep up with him until you become old enough that you have to shimmy off the couch, yourself.

     

    #334016
    @timb
    Participant

    Articulation requires extremely sophisticated fine oral-motor coordination.  I’ve heard speech therapists say (when I worked in Early Childhood Intervention) that using a baby bottle with a nipple for too long or if the child relies on nipple style pacifiers too much, that could slow his articulation development down a bit.

    #334011
    @write4u
    Participant

    timb said: I am quite sure that whales have complex verbal behavior.  It is interesting that they would have developed a completely different structure of grammar from us humans, but not surprising as their lives and physiologies and living environment is so different from ours.

    Yes, the environment shapes the behavior and behavioral skills through “natural selection”, which slowly “weeds out” less adapted individuals and rewards better adapted individuals with time to procreate, ensuring the continuance of the “better” survival traits.

    I find it remarkable that Nature logically uses the same evolutionary tools as humans who breed animals for best adaptive traits of a range of survival behaviors. It just takes Nature much longer, because it has no “intent” to select for beneficial traits. The selection is done inside the DNA and it is the result which is tested against the dangers and opportunities provided by the environment.

    The human “chromosome 2” is a result of a mutative fusion of two chromosomes (hominid chromosomes 2p + 2q =  human chromosome 2), in our “common ancestor”, resulted in the difference of chromosome count in humans and all other great apes, and made us the “smart ape”.

    Introduction: All great apes apart from man have 24 pairs of chromosomes. There is therefore a hypothesis that the common ancestor of all great apes had 24 pairs of chromosomes and that the fusion of two of the ancestor’s chromosomes created chromosome 2 in humans. The evidence for this hypothesis is very strong.

    Conclusion: The evidence that human chromosome 2 is a fusion of two of the common ancestor’s chromosomes is overwhelming.

    http://www.evolutionpages.com/chromosome_2.htm

    Apparently some viruses have learned to manipulate our DNA and use it for their own survival. The perfect parasitic approach, but is successful because it also promotes beneficial symbiotic relationships with other beneficial viruses and bacteria.

    Some viruses help us combat bacterial infection.  The bacteriophages are beneficial viruses.

    Bacteriophages: The Enemies of Bad Bacteria Are Our Friends!

    ABSTRACT;
    Some bacteria can enter the human body and make people ill. Usually, these diseases can be cured by antibiotics, but sometimes bacteria are resistant to them, meaning that the antibiotics do not kill the bacteria. In these cases, bacteria become very dangerous.

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria but are harmless to humans. To reproduce, they get into a bacterium, where they multiply, and finally they break the bacterial cell open to release the new viruses. Therefore, bacteriophages kill bacteria. Here, we explain how bacteriophages can be used to treat infectious diseases or to remove bacteria from other places where they are unwanted.

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcTix4hJVUhJIr7zfPJcE8lphIS4lSmBLtb3cA&usqp=CAU

    https://kids.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/frym.2016.00030

    #334019

    @timb,    My thought on it, is that although, ultimately, it makes sense that the most successful strain mutation will survive the best, and thus, eventually replace a less successful strain, in a particular environment, the less successful strain might keep surviving in another environment and still thrive.

    Then something totally radical happens to global conditions that knock the pins out from under dominate species, and suddenly these obscure strains hanging on in some backwaters, find themselves front and center – and now the environment provides adequate resources, to thrive and multiply and differentiate,  etc.

     

    I was trying to find a micro visualization of one in action but no luck.

    But lots of other amazing visual insights – YouTube: “Astonishing molecular machines: Drew Berry” and such.

    #334142
    @timb
    Participant

    Yes, the environment shapes the behavior and behavioral skills through “natural selection”…

    True, certain basic abilities are passed on by survival to reproduction,

    but the environment ALSO produces shaped behaviors and skills during the course of an organism’s life. 

    And not all of the skills that an organism attains is passed on genetically.  e.g., I could learn 7 languages, and if I subsequently fathered a child, my offspring still might only learn one.  It depends on her personal environmental history.

    #334180
    @write4u
    Participant

    W4U said; Yes, the environment shapes the behavior and behavioral skills through “natural selection”…

    timb said; True, certain basic abilities are passed on by survival to reproduction, but the environment ALSO produces shaped behaviors and skills during the course of an organism’s life.

    Absolutely, and these new skills are passed on in the offspring by example. This is where a mirror neural system becomes so important.

    And not all of the skills that an organism attains is passed on genetically.  e.g., I could learn 7 languages, and if I subsequently fathered a child, my offspring still might only learn one.  It depends on her personal environmental history.

    True, but again if the offspring is exposed to new skills practiced by the parents, they will learn and apply them and so on until certain skills become encoded in the DNA and the species has acquired a new genetic marker.  In human we can see where the son or daughter follow in the steps of the parents, in say arts, sports, and many special skills the children are exposed to and learn to imitate while growing up.

    It’s amazing to see a baby chimp trying to break a nut with a rock. it knows that if it can crack the nut there is a little morsel inside.

     

    It’s a wonderful opportunity to observe our less advanced cousins begin the learning process. This is how humans started their journey in quest of knowledge and skills.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Write4U.
    • This reply was modified 1 month, 3 weeks ago by Write4U.
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