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Civil Conduct


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  • #326711
    @lausten
    Keymaster

     

     

    I came across this on travels with the Braver Angels group. I think you need to join the Central Texas page to get to the PDF. I will follow up with comments

    Braver Angels Facebook Code of Conduct

    A PDF version, with better formatting, is at file:///D:/Master/Orgs/Braver%20Angels/Outreach/CentralTexas%20facebook%20code%20of%20conduct.html

    General Principles for Our Community Braver Angels includes people from all political perspectives, and we generally strive to welcome diverse viewpoints. It’s expected that members will post articles or statements that reflect their viewpoints in a measured way. While group administrators likely won’t often need to police the links that members post, it is the discussions about these posts that, if not respectfully executed, can lead to unproductive and offensive conduct.

     

    Regardless of the type of group or page a coordinator or other leader has established, the following principles should be followed in order to ensure that social media interactions involving members of our organization are positive and productive.

     

    The principles are represented by the acronym WINGS. Braver Angels members are expected to wear their WINGS whenever they engage in online conversation. Failure to observer these principles may result in removal from the group (at the sole discretion of the moderator).

     

    W – Write respectfully, with an openness to the idea that other opinions might be valid  It’s fine to have strong opinions, but express them respectfully. To be a part of Braver Angels Facebook discussions, you should keep an open mind and not degrade or discount others’ points of view. Work to maintain a “learning posture” that acknowledges there may be an angle to the discussion you’re not seeing.   Be sure to read an entire post and comment thread before weighing in, so you understand the context of the conversation you’re entering and people don’t need to repeat prior comments. That’s how we’ll all learn and grow together.

    I – Use “I” statements for your own viewpoints, and don’t question or doubt other people’s lived experiences.  Braver Angels members strive to represent their own viewpoints, rather than insisting that their statements speak for a whole group. We also recognize that each person’s lived experience is unique. If someone is telling you that certain statements or posts in the group make them feel a certain way, take that as presumptively valid.

    N – No gotchas; assume good faith. People join Braver Angels because they want to have honest, open discussions about our political divide. Engage with another’s best arguments, not just their weakest or most extreme. If someone posts something that seems ignorant or combative (or downright offensive), take a deep breath, assume that person meant well and has expressed themselves inartfully and a) work to engage them respectfully, or b) ignore it and move on.   If you feel the post has truly crossed the line and violates the spirit of our community as outlined here, please contact the group administrator. Don’t publicly question whether the person should be in the group, etc.

    G – Get to common ground to keep the conversation going.

    We should always welcome opportunities for respectful engagement with those who hold different views. When we disagree with one another, we should strive to do so accurately— avoiding exaggerated disagreement—and to recognize common ground. Even when our name is on our profile, it’s easy to don the mask that social media provides and get carried away with casting our fellow citizens as “others” and overemphasize our differences.

    S – Sarcasm doesn’t translate on Facebook. Don’t use it when engaging in an open, honest discussion. Enough said.

    • This topic was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Lausten.
    • This topic was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Lausten.
    • This topic was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Lausten.
    • This topic was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Lausten.
    #326717
    @lausten
    Keymaster

    What I like about it is its brevity. Thank you Occam (the once and great moderator here at CFI).

    Also, it clearly shows the solution to the problem of disagreement with respect. The use of “I” statements. If you disagree, it’s how you do it, and if someone does it, it must be respected. Easier said than done. Like if I said, “I feel that CC is a big wind bag full of farts”, that’s not an “I” statement despite it beginning with “I”. Just kidding CC.

    So, that’s where “N” comes in. Your “I” statement can’t be a gotcha. This one takes practice. For the listener and speaker. A question in the form, “Why do people like you believe that ridiculous thing?” is a gotcha. “What have you been reading”, is not a gotcha, even if you suspect that person is not well read. Much of the Braver Angels content revolves around this one and the options a) engage respectfully or b) move on.

    #327847
    @3point14rat
    Participant

    I freely admit to not being a very good follower of WINGS.

    They are simple principles to follow until you are in an actual discussion with an actual person who doesn’t follow any part of WINGS.

    There are lots of times I sit on the sidelines and follow threads that I know I will never be able to “W” or control my “S”.

    An example is Xain. Lausten, your work with Xain is incredible. I literally cannot post to him in a serious and calm manner any more. It’s like I become a volcano of sarcasm and ridicule ready to explode every time I read one of his posts. I am nothing like this in person, but being online gives me the time to sharpen my words in a way face-to-face conversations doesn’t allow.

    Having more time to craft a response should make one a better communicator, but it seems to be the opposite with me.

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