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Does DNA fully translate to how a human will look like as an adult?


Forums Forums Science and Technology Does DNA fully translate to how a human will look like as an adult?

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #332637
    @pratyekmeal6
    Participant

    I don’t know if for example how your hand will heal/regenerate the finger prints even if it’s severely damaged(but still able to be put back together).

    How far does DNA explain what a person will look like, can you tell like how far apart someone’s eyes will be when they’re fully grown or something?

    #332782
    #332814
    @thatoneguy
    Participant

    Basically, dna determines appearance 100%.  Other factors can play a role in what a person looks like as an adult, like obesity for example, but genes are the “blueprint” for each individual.

    #332866

    What’s that page supposed to prove, it’s a simple description of what’s known.  It has nothing about the complexities that occur between DNA and final human tissue or questions that have baffled scientists.

    You might be too young to remember when the human genome was decoded and the big scientific shock was how little DNA we possessed.  Then the shock of our DNA being nearly identical with chimps.  Then the realization that you can’t consider an organisms (any f’n organism) without also considering the environment it evolves within.

    So even though I have only a middling overview, I know enough not to make such an over simplistic overblown claim.

    DNA has been described as the blueprint for us – but just as blueprints for buildings must be translated by and into physical objects and the final product usually does not reflect the drawings 100%, the translation of DNA molecules into tissues, is a complex process requiring many coordinated players.

    Just one small aside, though I know if I had more time I could find plenty more examples described:

    Is height determined by genetics?
    Scientists estimate that about 80 percent of an individual’s height is determined by the DNA sequence variants they have inherited, but which genes these variants are in and what they do to affect height are only partially understood. …  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/traits/height

    #332883
    @thatoneguy
    Participant

     It has nothing about the complexities that occur between DNA and final human tissue or questions that have baffled scientists.

    Gene-environment interaction is pretty well understood. We know that appearance is entirely determined by DNA.

    You might be too young to remember when the human genome was decoded and the big scientific shock was how little DNA we possessed.

    LOL what?  We have exactly the amount of DNA we need, which is a lot.

    Then the shock of our DNA being nearly identical with chimps.

    Big deal. Chimp DNA  makes them Chimps just like our DNA makes us human.

    Is height determined by genetics?
    Scientists estimate that about 80 percent of an individual’s height is determined by the DNA sequence variants they have inherited, but which genes these variants are in and what they do to affect height are only partially understood. …  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/traits/height

    Yes, height is mostly determined by DNA, although we need enough nutrition in childhood to reach our potential height.

    Then the realization that you can’t consider an organisms (any f’n organism) without also considering the environment it evolves within.

    Yes, but that doesn’t matter at an individual level.

    #332898

    Gene-environment interaction is pretty well understood.

    Ironic, you say that, then follow with a bunch of quotes from others times, examples, when people thought they’d understood it pretty well, only to learn there were more surprises to factor into their understanding.

    Yes, things are incredibly well understood, but there’s also incredible, surprising discoveries and additions to our understanding.

    I don’t think we have an argument, I think you just way too oversimplified, then draw unwarranted conclusions.

    =================

    CC:  Then the realization that you can’t consider an organisms (any f’n organism) without also considering the environment it evolves within.
    Guy:  Yes, but that doesn’t matter at an individual level.

    Lordie, lordie, seriously?  Someday you’ll look back and blush.

    Guy:  although we need enough nutrition in childhood to reach our potential height.

    Do you appreciate that nutrition is part of “environment”?

    =====================

    How about some links to some learned backing for your claim? – Offer something I could learn from.

    #332941
    @thatoneguy
    Participant

    From the link you posted:

    https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/traits/haircolor

    The bottom of the page of this link explains the genetic basis of different physical traits.

     

    #332962

    CC:  How about some links to some learned backing for your claim?

    From the link you posted:

    https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/traits/haircolor

    The bottom of the page of this link explains the genetic basis of different physical traits.

    Okay here’s some cherry picking out of that info at the bottom of the page

    Topics in the Genetics and Human Traits chapter

    Are fingerprints determined by genetics?
    Like many other complex traits, studies suggest that both genetic and environmental factors play a role.

    The basic size, shape, and spacing of dermatoglyphs appear to be influenced by genetic factors. Studies suggest that multiple genes are involved, so the inheritance pattern is not straightforward. … These developmental factors cause each person’s dermatoglyphs to be different from everyone else’s. Even identical twins, who have the same DNA, have different fingerprints.

    Is eye color determined by genetics?
    Heterochromia can be caused by genetic changes or by a problem during eye development, or it can be acquired as a result of a disease or injury to the eye.

    Is intelligence determined by genetics?
    Like most aspects of human behavior and cognition, intelligence is a complex trait that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors.

    Is handedness determined by genetics?
    Like most aspects of human behavior, handedness is a complex trait that appears to be influenced by multiple factors, including genetics, environment, and chance.

    Is the probability of having twins determined by genetics?
    The likelihood of conceiving twins is a complex trait. It is probably affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors, depending on the type of twins. The two types of twins are classified as monozygotic and dizygotic.

    Is hair texture determined by genetics?
    Factors other than genetics can also influence hair texture and thickness. Hormones, certain medications, and chemicals such as hair relaxers can alter the characteristics of a person’s hair. Hair texture and thickness can also change with age.

    Is height determined by genetics?
    Scientists estimate that about 80 percent of an individual’s height is determined by the DNA sequence variants they have inherited, but which genes these variants are in and what they do to affect height are only partially understood.

    Are moles determined by genetics?
    Although the genetics of melanoma has been widely studied, much less is known about genes involved in the development of benign moles. … The formation of cancer is increasingly likely when combined with environmental factors, such as cell damage caused by ultraviolet radiation exposure.

    Are facial dimples determined by genetics?
    Dimples are usually considered a dominant genetic trait, which means that one copy of the altered gene in each cell is sufficient to cause dimples. However, some researchers say that there is no proof that dimples are inherited. Little research has been done to explore the genetics of dimples and it is not known which gene or genes may be involved.

    Is athletic performance determined by genetics?
    Studies focused on similarities and differences in athletic performance within families, including between twins, suggest that genetic factors underlie 30 to 80 percent of the differences among individuals in traits related to athletic performance.

    Is longevity determined by genetics?
    The duration of human life (longevity) is influenced by genetics, the environment, and lifestyle. Environmental improvements beginning in the 1900s extended the average life span dramatically with significant improvements in the availability of food and clean water, better housing and living conditions, reduced exposure to infectious diseases, and access to medical care.

    Is temperament determined by genetics?
    Scientists estimate that 20 to 60 percent of temperament is determined by genetics. Temperament, however, does not have a clear pattern of inheritance and there are not specific genes that confer specific temperamental traits. Instead, many (perhaps thousands) of common gene variations (polymorphisms) combine to influence individual characteristics of temperament. Other DNA modifications that do not alter DNA sequences (epigenetic changes) also likely contribute to temperament.

    So I’m getting the impression you agree with me that, though DNA plays the overwhelmingly roll in how creatures (and humans) looks, it is a gross mistake to claim that DNA is 100% responsible for how we look.

    Cheers, CC

    #332999

    You know Guy, one thing I love about adults is that adults can learn from their mistakes.

    #334547

    Hmmm, but he comes off as such a standup Guy.

    Though, I guess it helps explain why he can so easily forgive all of t rumps crimes and sins against humanity and the United States.

    #334555
    @widdershins
    Participant

    DNA plays a big role, but nothing contributes “100%”.  Drinking and smoking can drastically affect your appearance.  The amount of sunlight you get throughout your life plays a big role in how your skin looks too.  Illnesses, diet and environment are also contributors, as, I suspect, is your general mood throughout your life.

    So I would guess (I don’t know) that a lot of things contribute to how you look as an adult, but DNA probably plays the biggest role.

    #334565

    You’ll get no argument from me on that.   😉

     

    I’ve heard it said, when we are young we have the face god gave us, when we get old we have the face that life gave us.

     

    or something like that.

    #334569
    @timb
    Participant

    We know that appearance is entirely determined by DNA.

    Bullcrap, oneguy, if you are just going to try to pass off your crap assertions, by posting an irrelevant link, just shut the F up.

    Even if 2 people have the same set of genes, because of the different environments they experience – i.e. in the womb (maybe one got more nutrients than the other), the types of illnesses they have had as they grew up; the lifestyle they lead, etc, there can be differences in how much each twins’ genes are turned on or off – this can then affect the way each twin looks and behaves. This effect increases as the identical twins get older, because they are exposed to more and more diverse environmental events (different illnesses, jobs, friends, habits etc).    From https://www.twins.org.au/twins-and-families/frequently-asked-questions/62-twin-facts/22-do-identical-twins-always-look-alike

    Appearance is not at all 100% DNA.  Just because you are a tRump lover, doesn’t mean you have to lie like him or be ignorant like him, whichever it is, in your case.

     

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