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On the question of ultimate reality: Specifically for Xain


Forums Forums General Discussion On the question of ultimate reality: Specifically for Xain

  • This topic has 114 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated 1 month ago by Xain.
Viewing 10 posts - 106 through 115 (of 115 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #310145
    Tee Bryan Peneguy
    Participant

    Thanks, @TimB

    The worst part about it is that it affected all my major decisions for years. It’s hard to not imagine how different my life would have been, had treatment been available to me earlier in my life. Also, OCD tends to be a shape-shifter, and now I have a whole ‘nother type. But the religious rumination vanished 5 years ago now, and never came back. I’m grateful. I suspect a whole lot of depression, anxiety disorder and suicidality out there is poorly-understood, undiagnosed forms of OCD. I think I would have rather had ANYTHING else.

    #310159
    Xain
    Participant

    I wish I could let the rumination go but much of what it says sticks with me and when I share it others aren’t impacted by it.

    Why Buddhism is True

     

    Like me when they say the self is a process but not an entity and that focusing on your wishes and preferences won’t make you happy. So after that all I can think about is my likes and wishes being an enemy of me, how can I live like that?

    #310165
    Lausten
    Keymaster

    Excellent article with an excellent author. There are several good points in there, but I’m going to respond to the stuff about obsession, near the end.

    When he talks about our obsession with maintaining the self and then about his experiences of a greater self, he slips into claiming the one thing, the greater self, being better than the self defined by our bodies. However, he gives no evidence to why that not-self is greater. He’s talking about a peak experience. He gets it through meditation, but I’ve experienced it in neighborhood clean ups and football games. He says not experiencing this is denying reality, reality defined by Buddhism, again no evidence for what reality is or why these unusual peak experiences are real and sitting on my porch drinking coffee is not real.

    In my opinion, it’s all real. He focuses on the Darwinian need to see ourselves as separate so we will want to pass on our genes. Our desires for food and sex are in line with that. He’s right that if we constantly let go of our sense of self and chanted together and felt at one with the universe, we would be less interested in raising children and building bridges. What he never seems to get is that is exactly why we don’t live that way.

    #310180
    Tee Bryan Peneguy
    Participant

    @snowcity Curious. What would the “truth” of Buddhism mean, for you?

    Do you believe there’s only one objective truth in the universe that applies to everyone, Buddhist or not?

    Or is that “truth important to understand only from within the Buddhist paradigm?

     

    #310188
    TimB
    Participant

    “…So after that all I can think about is my likes and wishes being an enemy of me, how can I live like that?”

    If your sexual desires are your enemy you could have angry sex with them.  Then you could have make up sex with them. Your enemy (sexual desires) would have won but you could have had fun in the meantime and hopefully wind up making peace.

    #310196
    Xain
    Participant

    It’s more like the one truth that applies to all and everything, which is what Buddhism seems to argue. That the world is perfect is another.

    #310199
    Lausten
    Keymaster

    You didn’t answer the question.

    Is “the one truth that applies to all and everything” the “only one objective truth in the universe that applies to everyone, Buddhist or not”?

    #310227
    Xain
    Participant

    That I don’t know. I know they say it is so and expound on it and how science is proving it (though I’m not entirely sure), but I don’t know if it is the one truth but they make it feel like it is so.

    #310261
    Lausten
    Keymaster

    I don’t know if it is the one truth but they make it feel like it is so.

    Everyone I know feels this way. Not Buddhism for everyone, but about whatever truth they prefer to focus on. Doubt is part of belief. And if you take a strictly scientific view of the world, then you know that you can’t prove existence at all. Some people never think about it and function just fine. Others consider it for a bit, then realize they have to accept the limitations of knowledge and get on with life. To me, that’s what Buddhism tells us. If says you are suffering because you are worried that you should be doing something to make your life better, but actually, that best life is available to you at every moment.

    #310336
    Xain
    Participant

    But I value certainty which usually poses a problem. I don’t function well with doubt and ambiguity.

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