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These 19 undocumented immigrants worked for Trump


Forums Forums Politics and Social Issues These 19 undocumented immigrants worked for Trump

This topic contains 20 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Lausten 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #303626

    MikeYohe
    Participant

    A few decades back Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay together accounted for just 3% of the world’s soy production. By 2016 that number had risen to almost 50%. Soy is now South America’s most traded agricultural commodity. Today, these three countries account for more than 95% of the continent’s harvested area for soy. Ask yourself, what moved the American farmers down to South America to grow?

    United Dairy Farmers and Glanbia were looking to setup operations in Argentina. The reason was the industrial dairies were being closed down by labor problems in America. When it comes to labor, it does not take much to put an industrial dairy out of business. The milk producers are out of business without the dairies.

    The labor market was 85% illegal workers. Mostly organized by the Catholic Church. The church was not going to fight the new regulations. Which was a losing battle anyway. The answer was to change the system and the liabilities over to labor leasing companies. Away from the industrial dairies. Most of the dairies were managed by forth generation Dutch and Portugal dairy families.

    The dairies went from the standard 200 cow dairy to the 400 cows, 1,200 cows, 2,000 cows, 6,000 cows and end leveling off at the 8,000 cow dairies. If bigger, you would build two 8,000 cow dairies side by side. There were a few mega dairies that reached 50,000 cows. This all happened within a decade. A labor guideline was one worker for 100 cows. The dairies went from one to three workers to eighty workers. This got a lot of government regulations kicking in.

    The starting pay was at that time was $12/hr. With a lot of overtime. The average pay for jobs in town was $8/hr. with little overtime. Could not get the town people to work on a dairy farm. Set up several programs trying to get workers. It always had been and still was a job held by illegals in the western United States.

    What labor leasing did was fit in with the California banks who were financing the dairy growth, the insurance companies and the Accounting Firms specializing in Dairy operations. Glanbia and Dairy Farmers of America picked New Mexico instead of Argentina for plant thanks to a stabilizing labor market.  That plant used 88,000 dairy cows’ output to make more than 250 million pounds of cheese a year that would have been shipped from Argentina.

    Today all the big producers are working together, and the latest program is a $555M milk plant in Michigan.

    It was in a way a war. Fighting the government to keep the capitalist milk production system operating in America. It was the work and skill of the illegals that was the key to winning that war.

    Lausten the next time you eat a pizza, think of the years I spent traveling in California, New Mexico, Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington state keeping the illegals working to save a farming system. America has been steadily losing farms for decades now. We all need to help the farmers survive.

    #303629

    Lausten
    Participant
    #303654

    MikeYohe
    Participant

    Your missing the picture. The key word is “industrial”. Your posting is interesting, but it is from Wisconsin. The system works with many industrial dairies, not just a few. Think about it this way. One cow needs 70 lbs of green chop to eat in a day. If you have an 8,000-cow dairy that is 560,000 pounds of green chop per day. And the cows eat every day. The states I posted is where the industrial dairies are located. Because the land that is needed for protein. Just the amount of water needed for drinking and cleaning really adds up. When a company like the United Dairy Farmers builds a new plant in a state like Wisconsin or Michigan. They are taking over the smaller milk producing companies that cannot compete with the bigger companies due to government regulations.

    The biggest threat to you having milk on your table is what is called “Mad Cow”. Dairies in the widespread out lands of the west makes it safer. If Mad Cow hits the whole area has to be sealed off and no traffic can travel the roads until sterilization stations are setup. Every cow for a large geographic area is killed. So, one mad cow and every cow for a 50-mile radius has to be killed and the area cleaned.

    Do you want to trust your milk and cheese supply to another country like Argentina?

    These industrial dairies produce a lot of milk. And let’s say you are a milk processor in Florida. School is starting and you have to supply a lot of extra milk. You order milk from Utah and that milk is concentrated by taking most of the water out. Once the milk reaches Florida the water is add back into the milk. The dairies in the West keeps the smaller operations like in New York operating. All the extra milk is made into 500- and 1,000-pound blocks and barrels of cheese. The government buys the extra cheese and it is given to countries in need around the world.

     

    As far as jobs. I have had a lot of jobs. I was the top Electrolux vacuum salesman in the state and had a good Amway market along with selling eggs door to door. Along with the Grit Paper and holiday cards. Mowed lawns and shoved snow from sidewalks. I had gone to Los Angeles and worked in several factories, mostly in the City of Industry. But I did not like the city that much. I went back to frontal slope area to work as a farm hand. Worked the combine harvest. Left farming for the money of being a roughneck derrick hand in the oil field. That’s where I had my fifteen-birthday wildcatting in Nebraska. Opened a bar in California at twenty-one along with working as a machine tool rebuilder in the aerospace, having a small woodworking business and changed a California health law and got a contract to put a bamboo hut for my new concession business on the sand of La Jolla beach in the high tide zone – a first. I also had to operate a concession at a pool and tennis club to help qualify for the health permit at the beach. But my toughest project was working with the U.S. Energy Department working on Geothermal Educational trailers for a business I was trying to get up and running. The bad part was I did not have much time to play in the band at the bar or runs on my hog. Which was by the way a 1952 fully chopped pan head.

    All that gave me an education in business. By the time I was twenty-five I had operated in business that ranged from construction to gold mining in Mexico. And then things got interesting and fun. Trouble today is I have retired four times. I find it hard to not get involved in some business deals. That’s why I took up the hobbies of understanding about religion and the history of mankind. Always wanted that sailing trip around the world but my health stopped that dream. I live on a farm and I got to go and set water and feed the animals now. But I will finish my coffee first. What’s the hurry, I’m retired!

     

    #303660

    Lausten
    Participant

    You are conflating a dozen different things here, none of which relate back to what you said before except they are loosely related to cows.

    #303662

    MikeYohe
    Participant

    Either you get it, or you don’t. The cows are what makes the industrial dairies. The cows are worked by the illegals because the Americans will not work in the dairies. The government regulations that govern larger business were shutting down the large dairies labor pools. The milk processors were looking at moving to South America. The Soybean market was doing great there and maybe the milk industry would also fair well. The illegals were the ones that proved the industrial dairies could operate here once the IRS backed off because the co-employer laws of leased labor were not yet established, and the government did not want to go to court because they would win. But the changing the labor laws would affect the defense industry which also uses up to 85% leased labor contractors and a high percentage are from other countries. The only difference is the defense does not use illegals. But once the courts start changing the reciprocity system of the labor laws with other countries, the IRS courts will fill up fast and it will get political. It is that simple.

    #303663

    Lausten
    Participant

    Our government is not going to regulate an industry out of business unless that industry is literally killing people. Even then, it takes acts of congress, which you have yet to name. We’re still the biggest soybean producer in the world. All of this was in response to me challenging you that people come here to get jobs only long enough to qualify for law suits of some kind, I don’t know, you aren’t making any sense, and you haven’t provided any evidence of that. In fact, you just said that “illegals” are what kept the industry going here, which is my point.

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