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Venus, still a hell hole, but, but, is that a sign of life we detect.


Forums Forums Science and Technology Venus, still a hell hole, but, but, is that a sign of life we detect.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #334724

    Don’t worry, they aren’t signaling us.  Or aiming at us.

    But, Venus has just gotten the hook it needs to start stripping money away from the idiotic Manned Mars mission budget.

    Why Astronomers Think A Poisonous Gas On Venus Could Suggest Life On This Deadly Planet.

    Scott Manley – September 14th, 2020

    The surface of Venus is one of the least habitable places in the solar system but astronomers studying the planet have found a chemical in the upper atmosphere which they’ve been unable to explain by regular chemical processes.

    This is a long way from proof that life exists on Venus, but, the astronomers have worked hard over the last 3 years to rule out more mundane explanations. I won’t be surprised if someone else finds a less exciting explanation, but equally, I wouldn’t be entirely unsurprised if life found a way to persist in the atmosphere of Venus and remains there today.

     

    There are a bunch of other videos that folks have been pumping out today and a few that older ones’ that hinted at this.

    #334726
    @mriana
    Keymaster
    #334727

    The origins of this life could be the oceans that used to cover Venus up until as recently as a few 100 million years ago, after existing for billions of years.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-climate-modeling-suggests-venus-may-have-been-habitable

    It appears that a lack of plate tectonics may have doomed the further evolution of the planet and of live beyond basic microbes.

    More evidence Earth’s life is a result of an intimate dance between Geology and Biology.

     

     

    We Think Venus Had Water For Billions of Years, Losing it Suddenly

    Anton Petrov

    For decades, planetary scientists have suspected that ancient Mars was a much warmer, wetter environment than it is today, but estimates of just how much water Mars has lost since its formation vary widely. Now, new isotopic measurements by researchers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center reveal that an ocean once covered approximately twenty percent of the Martian surface. This new picture of early Mars is considerably wetter than many previous estimates, raising the odds for the ancient habitability of the Red Planet.

     

    #334761
    @3point14rat
    Participant

    The quote from the last post has Venus in the title and Mars in the body. Not sure which planet it’s talking about.

    #334766
    @widdershins
    Participant

    I’m not saying it’s aliens…but it’s aliens.

    #334813

    Yeah, that’s what happens when I’m rushed.  Had a few windows open and accidentally grabbed shit off the wrong page, luckily I noticed it in time to at least switch the url before having to run.

     

     

    Am I’m even more rushed today

    #334846
    @timb
    Participant

    If Venus had water for billions of years, it could have been Earth-like in having vast variety of life forms.  Advanced life forms there may have discovered oil, coal, and natural gas as sources of energy, and then blew away their more liveable atmosphere with global warming.

    Now the only life that can survive the hell that Venus has become, are possible extremophiles living in the atmosphere.

    The most interesting point, I think, is that if there is life on Venus, even if it is just some airborne microbes, it is indicative of the development of LIFE being the rule rather than the exception, in our Universe, or at least in our solar system.

    #334896

    Yeah, but don’t forget it took “advanced” a few billion years to develop here on Earth.

    If Venus had been on the same sort of developmental time line, complex life would have just been getting a foothold, when the stuffed up* planet exploded with internal heat and volcanism.

    *Stuffed up, like having no tectonics to provide outlets for expending extra energy.

     

    Something very very roughly analogues happened here on Earth during the snowball eras, with the mass of ice holding down the kettle cover, until the pressure got too much and tectonics let loose with massive volcanism that increased atmospheric CO2 levels and such, and brought back Earth from the brink of death/

    #336641
    @bestwork1989
    Participant

    Hi

    you are talking about finding a sign of life in Venus. If Venus had water for billions of years, it could have been Earth-like in having a vast variety of life forms.it will more clear in the future that what is the probability of life in Venus.

    #336642
    @bestwork1989
    Participant

    Hi

    you are talking about finding a sign of life in Venus. for life on any planet, there is a basic need for water, atmosphere, and of course humans. if there is the probability of water and a suitable atmosphere for humans, so it may be a sign of life in Venus.

    #336666

    for life on any planet, there is a basic need for water, atmosphere, and of course humans.

    Why, “of course humans”?

    Yeah, suitable atmosphere is definitely a big deal.

    #336685
    @bestwork1989
    Participant

    The Super Red Supergiant Star – UY Scuti, 1708 +- 192 Solar Radii, the biggest known star in the Universe UY Scuti.

     

    [url=http://blogmedia.tech/uyscuti.html] UY SCUTI [/url]

    #336693

    Ah Yeah, that looks pretty big.  Crazy story too.  It’s even sort of in our neighborhood, galactically speaking.

     

    Oh speaking of crazy star stories – ever hear of a Thorne-Żytkow object?

    Crazy in a whole new direction, that one is.              😉

     

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