How to Live Your Best Life, No Pseudoscience Required, in ‘Skeptical Inquirer’


For Immediate Release: October 23, 2019
Contact: Center for Inquiry
info@centerforinquiry.org - (716) 636-4869

Self-help gurus are unavoidable on bookstore shelves, daytime talk show panels, and sometimes even presidential debate stages, and each promises to help you “live your best life,” as long as you buy their pseudoscience-saturated books, supplements, videos, and power crystals. 

The latest issue of Skeptical Inquirer, the magazine for science and reason, offers a reality-based alternative to the fuzzy and expensive spiritualism sold by the likes of Deepak Chopra, Gwyneth Paltrow, and others: Nine evidence-based guidelines for a good life…and they don’t cost a thing! (Except, in this case, the price of a copy of Skeptical Inquirer, a mere $5.99 on the newsstand.)

Gary M. Bakker, a clinical psychologist with the University of Tasmania, presents guidelines that are proven by actual science to improve one’s well-being. There are common-sense tips such as engaging in regular exercise for both one’s body and brain, as well as helpful ways to reframe one’s thinking, by deemphasizing work as the source of fulfillment, teaching our children to be better at coping with life’s challenges, and processing our anxieties through his “Worry Filter.” 

Following Bakker’s advice is a way to make some meaningful, reality-based improvements to one’s life—no spiritualism, aromatherapies, or quantum entanglements required.

Also in this issue: Timothy Redmond evaluates the “Presidential Curse” that some believe have felled commanders-in-chief every two decades; Leo Igwe calls for an international response to witch hunting in parts of Africa; Robyn Blumner reviews Richard Dawkins’ recent appearance with comedian Ricky Gervais; Joe Nickell investigates the alleged haunting of insane asylums; and much more.

The November/December 2019 issue of Skeptical Inquirer is available now, with both print and digital subscriptions available.

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The Center for Inquiry (CFI) is a nonprofit educational, advocacy, and research organization headquartered in Amherst, New York, with executive offices in Washington, D.C. It is also home to the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason & Science, the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, and the Council for Secular Humanism. The Center for Inquiry strives to foster a secular society based on reason, science, freedom of inquiry, and humanist values. Visit CFI on the web at centerforinquiry.org.